Pjohanna's Blog











Author Randall Balmer sees a White House that is more moral than under former president Bush. I found this about his book:

How did we go from John F. Kennedy declaring that religion should play no role in the elections to Bush saying, “I believe that God wants me to be president”?

Historian Randall Balmer takes us on a tour of presidential religiosity in the last half of the twentieth century—from Kennedy’s 1960 speech that proposed an almost absolute wall between American political and religious life to the soft religiosity of Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society; from Richard Nixon’s manipulation of religion to fit his own needs to Gerald Ford’s quiet stoicism; from Jimmy Carter’s introduction of evangelicalism into the mainstream to Ronald Reagan’s co-option of the same group; from Bill Clinton’s covert way of turning religion into a non-issue to George W. Bush’s overt Christian messages, Balmer reveals the role religion has played in the personal and political lives of these American presidents.

Americans were once content to disregard religion as a criterion for voting, as in most of the modern presidential elections before Jimmy Carter.But today’s voters have come to expect candidates to fully disclose their religious views and to deeply illustrate their personal relationship to the Almighty. God in the White House explores the paradox of Americans’ expectation that presidents should simultaneously trumpet their religious views and relationship to God while supporting the separation of church and state. Balmer tells the story of the politicization of religion in the last half of the twentieth century, as well as the “religionization” of our politics. He reflects on the implications of this shift, which have reverberated in both our religious and political worlds, and offers a new lens through which to see not only these extraordinary individuals, but also our current political situation.

The religious right gain a lot of monetary compensation by getting involved in politics. They involve their flock, which equals a majority of voters, and candidates are aware of that power to help get them into the White House.  It is all about money and power. It has little to do with the bettering of a society or the following of Christ. There is a fine line that has been crossed, the past eight years has proven that. Theocracy is not what the United States is about.

The interesting fact about this author are his credentials:

Randall Balmer, an Episcopal priest, is professor of American religious history at Barnard College, Columbia University, and visiting professor at Yale University Divinity School. He has been a visiting professor at Dartmouth College and at Princeton, Yale, and Northwestern Universities. He has also taught in the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and is currently the Alonzo McDonald Distinguished Visiting Professor at Emory University’s Candler School of Theology.



{December 6, 2008}   Jesus vs. Modern day christians

I just read a blog about how a parent can avoid rasing an aethist child. He went on to give stats and biblical passages to support his theory. What I don’t understand about christians today is how they can not accept the fact that the way they are pushing their beliefs, their agenda onto others has caused this rift. They aren’t nice, they condemn people to hell. They lie to get their ways they over dramatize events and they act pretty disgusting. For the most part, they themselves are the ones that have pushed people away from faith. Besides that, faith is just that a belief that is faith based and not based on hard evidence. Either you believe or you don’t. The bottom line, if you believe in God, then let others be judged by Him.

When Jesus was here on earth he never acted the way christian people of today are acting.



{December 2, 2008}   Losing my FAITH

I was raised in a very strict religious household. I always had my doubts, I always had questions that could not really be voiced or in turn could not really be answered. I finally left that religion, about 10 years ago. About, maybe 5 years ago, I declared I didn’t believe that Satan existed. I am now at a crossroads. I have come to the fork on the road and I don’t know which way to turn.

I have always stated, I am a spiritual person, but do not believe in organized religion. I am now coming to terms that I might not really believe in the existance of God. This teriffies me. I wonder, when I am at my death bed, am I going to regret this?

I like to rationalize and I like to find evidence and facts. I don’t find any when it comes to HIM, yet, at the same time, I can’t find evidence for the opposite.

I don’t like where the world is heading, when it comes to HIM. I sometimes wonder if it is the religious zealots that are pushing me in the opposite direction. That is when I pause and wonder, should I allow them that much power?



et cetera